Activity led learning within aerospace at Coventry University

Caroline Lambert, Michael Basini, Stephen Hargrave

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is widely thought that, due to the nature of the subject, engineering education should be vocationally orientated. This paper explores the application of activity led learning that already exists in the Aerospace Systems degree at Coventry University. It was developed to be an educational experience that provides industry with graduates that are prepared for the workplace. The main assessment in the final year takes the form of a group exercise. The staff present themselves as a company requiring a complete design solution to a problem e.g., a new landing gear for a fighter aircraft and its related systems. The students are provided with a basic specification and draw on the knowledge they have acquired over the previous years to begin the exercise. They have to appreciate what it is they still do not know and interact with the academic staff as their 'customer' to fully solve the problem and provide a feasible solution. This not only expands their engineering knowledge but also encourages the development of interpersonal skills, communication skills and a more professional approach. How effective this style of teaching has been in improve the employability of the graduates is shown in our student exit statistics, feedback received from employers and the feedback from the students themselves. Developments into other modules and activities throughout the aerospace courses have included airport management exercises, glider design and build and participation in the first national Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV) competition.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEE 2008 - International Conference on Innovation, Good Practice and Research in Engineering Education
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2008
EventInternational Conference on Innovation, Good Practice and Research in Engineering Education, EE 2008 - Loughborough, United Kingdom
Duration: 14 Jul 200816 Jul 2008

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference on Innovation, Good Practice and Research in Engineering Education, EE 2008
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLoughborough
Period14/07/0816/07/08

Fingerprint

graduate
engineering
learning
staff
student
employability
communication skills
airport
aircraft
employer
customer
workplace
statistics
air
participation
industry
Teaching
management
knowledge
education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Lambert, C., Basini, M., & Hargrave, S. (2008). Activity led learning within aerospace at Coventry University. In EE 2008 - International Conference on Innovation, Good Practice and Research in Engineering Education

Activity led learning within aerospace at Coventry University. / Lambert, Caroline; Basini, Michael; Hargrave, Stephen.

EE 2008 - International Conference on Innovation, Good Practice and Research in Engineering Education. 2008.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding

Lambert, C, Basini, M & Hargrave, S 2008, Activity led learning within aerospace at Coventry University. in EE 2008 - International Conference on Innovation, Good Practice and Research in Engineering Education. International Conference on Innovation, Good Practice and Research in Engineering Education, EE 2008, Loughborough, United Kingdom, 14/07/08.
Lambert C, Basini M, Hargrave S. Activity led learning within aerospace at Coventry University. In EE 2008 - International Conference on Innovation, Good Practice and Research in Engineering Education. 2008
Lambert, Caroline ; Basini, Michael ; Hargrave, Stephen. / Activity led learning within aerospace at Coventry University. EE 2008 - International Conference on Innovation, Good Practice and Research in Engineering Education. 2008.
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