Accelerometer based physical activity levels, fundamental movement skills and weight status in British preschool children from a deprived area

Clare Roscoe, Rob James, Michael Duncan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)
7 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Preschool children are recommended to participate in a minimum of 180-min physical activity (PA) per day to enhance their development and overall health. Low PA and increased obesity are thought to be linked to low mastery of fundamental movement skills (FMS) in preschool children. This study sought to investigate whether FMS influences PA levels and weight status in preschool children, in an area of low socioeconomic status. Secondary aims of this study were to determine whether gender or day of the week affected the primary outcomes. One hundred eighty-five preschool children aged 3–4 years old, participated in the study. FMS proficiency was determined using the Test of Gross Motor Development-2. PA was determined using triaxial accelerometry over a 4-day period. None of the samples met the recommended 180 min of PA. There were no significant differences in PA or weight status between preschool children with high, medium or low FMS mastery (P < 0.05). There were also no significant correlations between overall FMS and moderate to vigorous PA during the week or weekend days. Conclusion: Girls scored significantly greater at the hop, leap, and skip (locomotor skills) and the boys significantly higher at the kick (object control) (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in PA or weight status between preschool children with high, medium, or low FMS mastery, possibly because FMS mastery had not developed to a high enough level to affect PA and FMS are considered independent of physical fitness and physical features, such as weight and height.What is Known:•FMS are commonly developed in early childhood, providing the building blocks for future motor skills, good health and lifelong PA.•No study to date has measured FMS, PA levels and weight status in preschool children, to determine whether FMS competency influences PA levels and weight status in preschool children, in an area of low SES.What is New:•FMS competency did not appear to influence the level of PA or weight status in this sample of UK preschool children from a low SES area.•PA and FMS may not be fully established and consequently not strongly linked at the ages of 3–4 years, therefore, the preschool years could be influential in providing a window to maximise input of good/optimal development of motor competence before the proficiency barrier sets in and we need remedial intervention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1043-1052
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean Journal of Pediatrics
Volume178
Issue number7
Early online date7 May 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2019

Fingerprint

Preschool Children
Exercise
Weights and Measures
Accelerometry
Humulus
Motor Skills
Physical Fitness
Health
Social Class
Mental Competency
Obesity

Bibliographical note

Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative
Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use,
distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

Keywords

  • Fundamental movement skills
  • GENEActiv Accelerometer
  • Physical activity
  • Preschool children
  • Test of Gross Motor Development-2

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

@article{4d75056d4c0a450581d5359777da7803,
title = "Accelerometer based physical activity levels, fundamental movement skills and weight status in British preschool children from a deprived area",
abstract = "Preschool children are recommended to participate in a minimum of 180-min physical activity (PA) per day to enhance their development and overall health. Low PA and increased obesity are thought to be linked to low mastery of fundamental movement skills (FMS) in preschool children. This study sought to investigate whether FMS influences PA levels and weight status in preschool children, in an area of low socioeconomic status. Secondary aims of this study were to determine whether gender or day of the week affected the primary outcomes. One hundred eighty-five preschool children aged 3–4 years old, participated in the study. FMS proficiency was determined using the Test of Gross Motor Development-2. PA was determined using triaxial accelerometry over a 4-day period. None of the samples met the recommended 180 min of PA. There were no significant differences in PA or weight status between preschool children with high, medium or low FMS mastery (P < 0.05). There were also no significant correlations between overall FMS and moderate to vigorous PA during the week or weekend days. Conclusion: Girls scored significantly greater at the hop, leap, and skip (locomotor skills) and the boys significantly higher at the kick (object control) (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in PA or weight status between preschool children with high, medium, or low FMS mastery, possibly because FMS mastery had not developed to a high enough level to affect PA and FMS are considered independent of physical fitness and physical features, such as weight and height.What is Known:•FMS are commonly developed in early childhood, providing the building blocks for future motor skills, good health and lifelong PA.•No study to date has measured FMS, PA levels and weight status in preschool children, to determine whether FMS competency influences PA levels and weight status in preschool children, in an area of low SES.What is New:•FMS competency did not appear to influence the level of PA or weight status in this sample of UK preschool children from a low SES area.•PA and FMS may not be fully established and consequently not strongly linked at the ages of 3–4 years, therefore, the preschool years could be influential in providing a window to maximise input of good/optimal development of motor competence before the proficiency barrier sets in and we need remedial intervention.",
keywords = "Fundamental movement skills, GENEActiv Accelerometer, Physical activity, Preschool children, Test of Gross Motor Development-2",
author = "Clare Roscoe and Rob James and Michael Duncan",
note = "Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00431-019-03390-z",
language = "English",
volume = "178",
pages = "1043--1052",
journal = "European Journal of Pediatrics",
issn = "0340-6199",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Accelerometer based physical activity levels, fundamental movement skills and weight status in British preschool children from a deprived area

AU - Roscoe, Clare

AU - James, Rob

AU - Duncan, Michael

N1 - Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http:// creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

PY - 2019/7/1

Y1 - 2019/7/1

N2 - Preschool children are recommended to participate in a minimum of 180-min physical activity (PA) per day to enhance their development and overall health. Low PA and increased obesity are thought to be linked to low mastery of fundamental movement skills (FMS) in preschool children. This study sought to investigate whether FMS influences PA levels and weight status in preschool children, in an area of low socioeconomic status. Secondary aims of this study were to determine whether gender or day of the week affected the primary outcomes. One hundred eighty-five preschool children aged 3–4 years old, participated in the study. FMS proficiency was determined using the Test of Gross Motor Development-2. PA was determined using triaxial accelerometry over a 4-day period. None of the samples met the recommended 180 min of PA. There were no significant differences in PA or weight status between preschool children with high, medium or low FMS mastery (P < 0.05). There were also no significant correlations between overall FMS and moderate to vigorous PA during the week or weekend days. Conclusion: Girls scored significantly greater at the hop, leap, and skip (locomotor skills) and the boys significantly higher at the kick (object control) (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in PA or weight status between preschool children with high, medium, or low FMS mastery, possibly because FMS mastery had not developed to a high enough level to affect PA and FMS are considered independent of physical fitness and physical features, such as weight and height.What is Known:•FMS are commonly developed in early childhood, providing the building blocks for future motor skills, good health and lifelong PA.•No study to date has measured FMS, PA levels and weight status in preschool children, to determine whether FMS competency influences PA levels and weight status in preschool children, in an area of low SES.What is New:•FMS competency did not appear to influence the level of PA or weight status in this sample of UK preschool children from a low SES area.•PA and FMS may not be fully established and consequently not strongly linked at the ages of 3–4 years, therefore, the preschool years could be influential in providing a window to maximise input of good/optimal development of motor competence before the proficiency barrier sets in and we need remedial intervention.

AB - Preschool children are recommended to participate in a minimum of 180-min physical activity (PA) per day to enhance their development and overall health. Low PA and increased obesity are thought to be linked to low mastery of fundamental movement skills (FMS) in preschool children. This study sought to investigate whether FMS influences PA levels and weight status in preschool children, in an area of low socioeconomic status. Secondary aims of this study were to determine whether gender or day of the week affected the primary outcomes. One hundred eighty-five preschool children aged 3–4 years old, participated in the study. FMS proficiency was determined using the Test of Gross Motor Development-2. PA was determined using triaxial accelerometry over a 4-day period. None of the samples met the recommended 180 min of PA. There were no significant differences in PA or weight status between preschool children with high, medium or low FMS mastery (P < 0.05). There were also no significant correlations between overall FMS and moderate to vigorous PA during the week or weekend days. Conclusion: Girls scored significantly greater at the hop, leap, and skip (locomotor skills) and the boys significantly higher at the kick (object control) (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in PA or weight status between preschool children with high, medium, or low FMS mastery, possibly because FMS mastery had not developed to a high enough level to affect PA and FMS are considered independent of physical fitness and physical features, such as weight and height.What is Known:•FMS are commonly developed in early childhood, providing the building blocks for future motor skills, good health and lifelong PA.•No study to date has measured FMS, PA levels and weight status in preschool children, to determine whether FMS competency influences PA levels and weight status in preschool children, in an area of low SES.What is New:•FMS competency did not appear to influence the level of PA or weight status in this sample of UK preschool children from a low SES area.•PA and FMS may not be fully established and consequently not strongly linked at the ages of 3–4 years, therefore, the preschool years could be influential in providing a window to maximise input of good/optimal development of motor competence before the proficiency barrier sets in and we need remedial intervention.

KW - Fundamental movement skills

KW - GENEActiv Accelerometer

KW - Physical activity

KW - Preschool children

KW - Test of Gross Motor Development-2

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85065423255&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00431-019-03390-z

DO - 10.1007/s00431-019-03390-z

M3 - Article

VL - 178

SP - 1043

EP - 1052

JO - European Journal of Pediatrics

JF - European Journal of Pediatrics

SN - 0340-6199

IS - 7

ER -