A systems approach to training aeronautical decision making: From identifying training needs to verifying training solutions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The human factors analysis and classification system (HFACS) was developed as an analytical framework for the investigation of the role of human error in aviation accidents. A total of 523 accidents in the Republic of China (ROC) Air Force between 1978 and 2002 were analysed using this framework. The results showed that in a great many cases, poor pilot decision making was implicated. Following a survey of flight instructors' opinions, two of most promising mnemonic-based methods currently available to guide the decision making of pilots were identified (SHOR and DESIDE). These methods were developed into a short (four hour) aeronautical decision making training course. A total of 41 pilots from the Republic of China Tactical Training Wing then participated in a study to evaluate the effectiveness of this training course. Half of the participants received the short ADM training programme and half did not. Their decision making skill was evaluated in a series of emergency situations presented in a full-flight simulator. Furthermore, their decision making processes were examined in a series of pencil-and-paper based tests. The results clearly showed significant improvements in the quality of pilots' situation assessment and risk management (underpinning processes in pilot decision making) although this was usually at the expense of speed of response. Pilots used the quicker to apply SHOR mnemonic in situations that which required a fast decision and the more comprehensive but slower to perform DESIDE method when there were fewer time pressures. The results do strongly suggest that ADM is trainable and the short programme devised was effective.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)267-279
Number of pages13
JournalThe Aeronautical Journal
Volume111
Issue number1118
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2007
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aerospace Engineering

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