A survey study investigating perceptions and acceptance of the whole-body imaging techniques used for the diagnosis of myeloma

Adam Ryder, Caron Parsons, Charles Hutchinson, Brendan Greaney, C Douglas Thake

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to investigate patient perceptions and acceptance of the three whole-body imaging (WBI) modalities used for diagnosing myeloma; radiographic skeletal survey (RSS), low-dose whole-body computed tomography (LD-WBCT) and whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI). The secondary aim was to explore the factors affecting the acceptance of whole-body imaging for myeloma. Methods: 60 participants (median age = 58.5 years old) recruited from three NHS trusts and social media completed a survey in which they scored their experiences of each WBI modality on nine 5-point rating scales. Spearman's correlation coefficient, Kruskal–Wallis, Mann–Whitney and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to compare scores between different WBI techniques. Participants were invited to provide additional open text responses for interpretation using thematic analysis. Results: All modalities demonstrated high levels of acceptability (median score = 4). WB-MRI was perceived as more stressful (p=<0.01) and claustrophobic (p=<0.01) than RSS and LD-WBCT. Thematic analysis showed patients understood the importance of imaging but had concerns about exacerbated pain and the results. WB-MRI was difficult to tolerate due to its duration. Respondents were averse to the physical manipulation required for RSS while remaining stationary was perceived as a benefit of LD-WBCT and WB-MRI. Staff interactions had both positive and negative effects on acceptance. Conclusions: Despite the psychological and physical burdens of WBI, patients accepted its role in facilitating diagnosis. Staff support is vital for facilitating a positive whole-body imaging experience. Healthcare practitioners can improve WBI acceptance by understanding the burdens imposed by WBI and adopting the personalised care model. Implications for practice: Patient experience can be improved by tailoring examinations to individual needs. RSS can be as burdensome as other WBI techniques and could be superseded by LD-WBCT or WB-MRI.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1149-1157
Number of pages9
JournalRadiography
Volume27
Issue number4
Early online date10 Jul 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors would like to thank the College of Radiographers Industry Partnership scheme for providing the funding that enabled the study to be conducted (grant number CoRIPS 177). Additional thanks go to the University Hospitals of Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust and Coventry University for providing additional support.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021

Funder

College of Radiographers Industry Partnership scheme for providing the funding that enabled the study to be conducted (grant number CoRIPS 177).

Keywords

  • Low-dose whole-body computed tomography
  • Myeloma
  • Patient perceptions
  • Patient-centered care
  • Skeletal survey
  • Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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