A Study to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Best Beginnings’ Baby Buddy Phone App in England: A Protocol Paper

Toity Deave, Sally Kendall, Raghu Lingam, Crispin Day, Trudy Goodenough, Elizabeth Bailey, Sam Ginja, Samantha Nightingale, Jane Coad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)
7 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Introduction
Developments in information and communication technologies have enabled electronic health and seen a huge expansion over the last decade. This has increased the possibility of self-management of health issues.
Purpose
To assess the effectiveness of the Baby Buddy app on maternal self-efficacy and mental well-being three months post-birth in a sample of mothers recruited antenatally. In addition, to explore when, why and how mothers use the app and consider any benefits the app may offer them in relation to their parenting, health, relationships or communication with their child, friends, family members or health professionals.

Methods
We will use a mixed-methods approach, a cohort study, a qualitative element and analysis of in-app data. Participants will be first-time pregnant women, aged 16 years and over, between 12 and 16 weeks of gestation and recruited from five English study sites.
Evaluation plan
We will compare maternal self-efficacy and mental health at three months post-delivery in mothers who have downloaded the Baby Buddy app compared with those that have not downloaded the app, controlling for confounding factors. Women will be recruited antenatally between 12 and 16 weeks of gestation. Further follow-ups will take place at 35 weeks of gestation and three months post-birth. Data from the cohort study will be supplemented by in-app data that will include, for example, patterns of usage. Qualitative data will assess the impact of the app on the lives of pregnant women and health professionals using both focus groups and interviews.
Ethics
Approval from the West Midlands-South Birmingham Research Ethics Committee (NRES) (16/WM/0029) and the University of the West of England, Bristol, Research Ethics Committee (HAS.16.08.001).
Dissemination
Findings of the study will be published in peer reviewed and professional journals, presented locally, nationally and at international conferences. Participants will receive a summary of the findings and the results will be published on Best Beginnings’ website.


Original languageEnglish
Article numbere19
Number of pages6
JournalPrimary Health Care Research and Development
Volume20
Early online date23 Jul 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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England
Mothers
Research Ethics Committees
Self Efficacy
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Health
Cohort Studies
Communication
Parturition
Family Health
Parenting
Women's Health
Self Care
Focus Groups
Mental Health
Interviews
Technology

Keywords

  • App
  • Best Beginnings
  • Evaluation
  • Parenting
  • Pregnancy

Cite this

A Study to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Best Beginnings’ Baby Buddy Phone App in England : A Protocol Paper. / Deave, Toity; Kendall, Sally ; Lingam, Raghu; Day, Crispin ; Goodenough, Trudy ; Bailey, Elizabeth; Ginja, Sam; Nightingale, Samantha; Coad, Jane.

In: Primary Health Care Research and Development, Vol. 20, e19, 2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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JO - Primary Health Care Research and Development

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