A Review of the Effectiveness of the Nigerian Whistleblowing Stopgap Policy of 2016 and the Whistleblower Protection Bill of 2019

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Abstract

The act of whistleblowing is not common in Nigeria; this can be attributed to the cultural norms of Nigerian society where deference is paid to those in positions of power and it is often viewed as taboo to speak up against them. This problem of not speaking up is further compounded by the lack of robust whistleblowing legislation which protects whistleblowers from reprisals. The need to protect whistleblowers was brought to the forefront after the implementation in 2016 of the Nigerian stopgap policy on whistleblowing, leading to the Whistleblower Protection Bill proposed in 2019, legislation that seeks to provide wider protection to whistleblowers. This article examines this bill, identifying its limitations; it does not rehash previous scholarly debates about whether incentives are necessary, but rather focuses on bringing the Nigerian perspective to the fore, thus contributing to the existing literature in this area.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)487-494
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of African Law
Volume67
Issue number3
Early online date31 Mar 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Oct 2023

Bibliographical note

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Keywords

  • whisteblowing
  • whistleblower protection
  • corruption
  • incentives
  • reprisals

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