A randomized controlled study of the Arthritis Self-Management Programme in the UK

Julie H. Barlow, Andrew P. Turner, C. Wright

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    287 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the Arthritis Self-Management Programme (ASMP) improves perceptions of control, health behaviours and health status, and changes use of health care resources. The design was a pragmatic randomized controlled study; participants were allocated to ASMP (Intervention Group) or a 4-month waiting-list Control Group. The Intervention Group completed a 12-month follow-up. In total, 544 people with arthritis were recruited from the community--311 in the Intervention Group and 233 in the Control Group. Main outcome measures included: arthritis self-efficacy, health behaviours (exercise, cognitive symptom management, diet and relaxation) and health status (pain, fatigue, anxiety, depression and positive affect). At 4 months follow-up, the ASMP had a significant effect on arthritis self-efficacy for other symptoms and pain subscales. Performance of a range of health behaviours (cognitive symptom management, communication with physicians, dietary habit, exercise and relaxation) was significantly greater among the Intervention Group. The Intervention Group were significantly less depressed and had greater positive mood. In addition, trends towards decreases on fatigue and anxiety were noted. Physical functioning, pain and GP visits remained stable at 4 months. A similar pattern of findings was found at 12 months follow-up for the Intervention Group. Furthermore, a significant improvement was found on pain and visits to GPs had decreased. Apart from a small improvement on physical functioning among the Intervention Group participants with osteoarthritis 12 months, all effects were independent of the type of arthritis. The findings suggest that the ASMP is effective in promoting improvements in perception of control, health behaviours and health status, when delivered in UK settings.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)665-680
    JournalHealth Education Research
    Volume15
    Issue number6
    Publication statusPublished - Dec 2000

    Fingerprint

    Self Care
    Arthritis
    Health Behavior
    management
    health behavior
    Group
    pain
    Health Status
    Pain
    Neurobehavioral Manifestations
    health status
    Self Efficacy
    Fatigue
    fatigue
    self-efficacy
    Anxiety
    Exercise
    Control Groups
    anxiety
    Waiting Lists

    Bibliographical note

    The full text of this item is not available from the repository.

    Keywords

    • arthritis
    • patient education
    • self-management

    Cite this

    A randomized controlled study of the Arthritis Self-Management Programme in the UK. / Barlow, Julie H.; Turner, Andrew P.; Wright, C.

    In: Health Education Research, Vol. 15, No. 6, 12.2000, p. 665-680.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    @article{9c01615225f5443588ad4774d70418e4,
    title = "A randomized controlled study of the Arthritis Self-Management Programme in the UK",
    abstract = "The objective of this study was to determine whether the Arthritis Self-Management Programme (ASMP) improves perceptions of control, health behaviours and health status, and changes use of health care resources. The design was a pragmatic randomized controlled study; participants were allocated to ASMP (Intervention Group) or a 4-month waiting-list Control Group. The Intervention Group completed a 12-month follow-up. In total, 544 people with arthritis were recruited from the community--311 in the Intervention Group and 233 in the Control Group. Main outcome measures included: arthritis self-efficacy, health behaviours (exercise, cognitive symptom management, diet and relaxation) and health status (pain, fatigue, anxiety, depression and positive affect). At 4 months follow-up, the ASMP had a significant effect on arthritis self-efficacy for other symptoms and pain subscales. Performance of a range of health behaviours (cognitive symptom management, communication with physicians, dietary habit, exercise and relaxation) was significantly greater among the Intervention Group. The Intervention Group were significantly less depressed and had greater positive mood. In addition, trends towards decreases on fatigue and anxiety were noted. Physical functioning, pain and GP visits remained stable at 4 months. A similar pattern of findings was found at 12 months follow-up for the Intervention Group. Furthermore, a significant improvement was found on pain and visits to GPs had decreased. Apart from a small improvement on physical functioning among the Intervention Group participants with osteoarthritis 12 months, all effects were independent of the type of arthritis. The findings suggest that the ASMP is effective in promoting improvements in perception of control, health behaviours and health status, when delivered in UK settings.",
    keywords = "arthritis, patient education, self-management",
    author = "Barlow, {Julie H.} and Turner, {Andrew P.} and C. Wright",
    note = "The full text of this item is not available from the repository.",
    year = "2000",
    month = "12",
    language = "English",
    volume = "15",
    pages = "665--680",
    journal = "Health Education Research",
    issn = "0268-1153",
    publisher = "Oxford University Press",
    number = "6",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - A randomized controlled study of the Arthritis Self-Management Programme in the UK

    AU - Barlow, Julie H.

    AU - Turner, Andrew P.

    AU - Wright, C.

    N1 - The full text of this item is not available from the repository.

    PY - 2000/12

    Y1 - 2000/12

    N2 - The objective of this study was to determine whether the Arthritis Self-Management Programme (ASMP) improves perceptions of control, health behaviours and health status, and changes use of health care resources. The design was a pragmatic randomized controlled study; participants were allocated to ASMP (Intervention Group) or a 4-month waiting-list Control Group. The Intervention Group completed a 12-month follow-up. In total, 544 people with arthritis were recruited from the community--311 in the Intervention Group and 233 in the Control Group. Main outcome measures included: arthritis self-efficacy, health behaviours (exercise, cognitive symptom management, diet and relaxation) and health status (pain, fatigue, anxiety, depression and positive affect). At 4 months follow-up, the ASMP had a significant effect on arthritis self-efficacy for other symptoms and pain subscales. Performance of a range of health behaviours (cognitive symptom management, communication with physicians, dietary habit, exercise and relaxation) was significantly greater among the Intervention Group. The Intervention Group were significantly less depressed and had greater positive mood. In addition, trends towards decreases on fatigue and anxiety were noted. Physical functioning, pain and GP visits remained stable at 4 months. A similar pattern of findings was found at 12 months follow-up for the Intervention Group. Furthermore, a significant improvement was found on pain and visits to GPs had decreased. Apart from a small improvement on physical functioning among the Intervention Group participants with osteoarthritis 12 months, all effects were independent of the type of arthritis. The findings suggest that the ASMP is effective in promoting improvements in perception of control, health behaviours and health status, when delivered in UK settings.

    AB - The objective of this study was to determine whether the Arthritis Self-Management Programme (ASMP) improves perceptions of control, health behaviours and health status, and changes use of health care resources. The design was a pragmatic randomized controlled study; participants were allocated to ASMP (Intervention Group) or a 4-month waiting-list Control Group. The Intervention Group completed a 12-month follow-up. In total, 544 people with arthritis were recruited from the community--311 in the Intervention Group and 233 in the Control Group. Main outcome measures included: arthritis self-efficacy, health behaviours (exercise, cognitive symptom management, diet and relaxation) and health status (pain, fatigue, anxiety, depression and positive affect). At 4 months follow-up, the ASMP had a significant effect on arthritis self-efficacy for other symptoms and pain subscales. Performance of a range of health behaviours (cognitive symptom management, communication with physicians, dietary habit, exercise and relaxation) was significantly greater among the Intervention Group. The Intervention Group were significantly less depressed and had greater positive mood. In addition, trends towards decreases on fatigue and anxiety were noted. Physical functioning, pain and GP visits remained stable at 4 months. A similar pattern of findings was found at 12 months follow-up for the Intervention Group. Furthermore, a significant improvement was found on pain and visits to GPs had decreased. Apart from a small improvement on physical functioning among the Intervention Group participants with osteoarthritis 12 months, all effects were independent of the type of arthritis. The findings suggest that the ASMP is effective in promoting improvements in perception of control, health behaviours and health status, when delivered in UK settings.

    KW - arthritis

    KW - patient education

    KW - self-management

    M3 - Article

    VL - 15

    SP - 665

    EP - 680

    JO - Health Education Research

    JF - Health Education Research

    SN - 0268-1153

    IS - 6

    ER -