A process evaluation using a Self Determination Theory measure of the co-delivery of self management training by clinicians and by lay tutors

S. Sharma, Louise M. Wallace, Joanna Kosmala-Anderson, Andrew P. Turner

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    5 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective: To evaluate the co-delivery style of lay and clinician co-tutors of courses for patients, and courses for clinicians to support their patients' self-management skills. Methods: Motivational style of course delivery was assessed in 37 patient course sessions and 14 clinician workshops by independent observers using four Self Determination Theory rating scales and ethnographic notes. Forty-five tutors and 35 attendees were interviewed about their experience of co-delivered courses. Results: Lay and clinician tutors had similar motivational styles, with significant differences between the four motivational style scales; patient courses (F(3, 216)=3.437, p=.018); and clinician courses (F(3, 78)=3.37, p=.025).The courses were experienced as co productive in style as suggested during interviews, but adherence to manuals limited the tutors' contributions. Lay and clinician tutors scored higher on providing structure and engaging participants than they scored on supporting autonomous decision making and involvement. Conclusion: Co-delivery was a successful model, affording opportunities to demonstrate co-production skills. Practice implications: There is more scope to enable lay and clinician tutors to use their respective expertise in supporting self-management, and for tutor training to encourage a less didactic delivery style.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)38-45
    JournalPatient Education and Counseling
    Volume90
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

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    Personal Autonomy
    Self Care
    Decision Making
    Interviews
    Education

    Bibliographical note

    The full text of this item is not available from the repository.
    NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Patient Education and Counseling. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Patient Education and Counseling [Vol 90, Issue 1 (2013)]. DOI: 10.1016/j.pec.2012.09.002.

    Keywords

    • chronic conditions
    • clinician training
    • co-delivery
    • co-production
    • lay tutor
    • patient-centred
    • self-care
    • self-management
    • self-management training

    Cite this

    A process evaluation using a Self Determination Theory measure of the co-delivery of self management training by clinicians and by lay tutors. / Sharma, S.; Wallace, Louise M.; Kosmala-Anderson, Joanna; Turner, Andrew P.

    In: Patient Education and Counseling, Vol. 90, No. 1, 2013, p. 38-45.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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