A Poetics of Care: Slowness, Ethics and Enchantment in Gianikian & Ricci Lucchi’s Oeuvre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Maintaining that Angela Ricci Lucchi and Yervant Gianikian have a privileged relationship to history may sound quite predictable. Similarly, describing their artistic effort as that of archaeologists, historians, or entomologists is a delicate move: for on the one hand, their famous “Non, Non, Non” claim expresses their basic refusal of any sort of constraining etiquettes, while on the other hand their work still continues to be labeled in a number of ways, thereby demonstrating the impossibility to identify an ultimate footing that synthesizes the fascinating complexity of their oeuvre.

Trying to locate my argument outside such rhetoric, what I wish to propose is not an alternative or further reading of Angela Ricci Lucchi and Yervant Gianikian’s artistic trajectory, but rather an attempt to imagine the philosophy innervating their work and to observe the gestures informed by it. From this point, my review of their films and video installations does not aim to provide a counter-description opposed to the several detailed accounts to which I am indebted, but to complement them by seeing these works as the crystallization of a specific way of conceiving time—a way that is apt to restitute the past, inhabit the present and look at the future. Their work employs a conception of temporality that transcends the diegesis, and which I believe cannot be solely described in terms of a feature typical of slow cinema. Conversely, I shall contend that this approach to temporality represents the most immediately recognizable—but at the same time, the densest aspect—of a very peculiar poetics that is merely the audio-visual output of a wider creative process and of a broader, personal and very concrete relationship with the world.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)28-37
Number of pages9
JournalFound Footage Magazine
Volume3
Issue numberSpring
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2017

Fingerprint

Ethics of Care
Enchantment
Poetics
Temporality
Impossibility
Trajectory
Crystallization
Philosophy
Footings
Archaeologists
Video Installation
Diegesis
Sound
Creative Process
Rhetoric
Conception
Wishes
Historian
History
Gesture

Bibliographical note

This paper is not available on the repository. The article is in press.
Creative Commons Attribution License

Cite this

A Poetics of Care : Slowness, Ethics and Enchantment in Gianikian & Ricci Lucchi’s Oeuvre. / De Rosa, Miriam.

In: Found Footage Magazine, Vol. 3, No. Spring, 03.2017, p. 28-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{cf3f6b1f6e8b4b52ba26f2315a1bb366,
title = "A Poetics of Care: Slowness, Ethics and Enchantment in Gianikian & Ricci Lucchi’s Oeuvre",
abstract = "Maintaining that Angela Ricci Lucchi and Yervant Gianikian have a privileged relationship to history may sound quite predictable. Similarly, describing their artistic effort as that of archaeologists, historians, or entomologists is a delicate move: for on the one hand, their famous “Non, Non, Non” claim expresses their basic refusal of any sort of constraining etiquettes, while on the other hand their work still continues to be labeled in a number of ways, thereby demonstrating the impossibility to identify an ultimate footing that synthesizes the fascinating complexity of their oeuvre.Trying to locate my argument outside such rhetoric, what I wish to propose is not an alternative or further reading of Angela Ricci Lucchi and Yervant Gianikian’s artistic trajectory, but rather an attempt to imagine the philosophy innervating their work and to observe the gestures informed by it. From this point, my review of their films and video installations does not aim to provide a counter-description opposed to the several detailed accounts to which I am indebted, but to complement them by seeing these works as the crystallization of a specific way of conceiving time—a way that is apt to restitute the past, inhabit the present and look at the future. Their work employs a conception of temporality that transcends the diegesis, and which I believe cannot be solely described in terms of a feature typical of slow cinema. Conversely, I shall contend that this approach to temporality represents the most immediately recognizable—but at the same time, the densest aspect—of a very peculiar poetics that is merely the audio-visual output of a wider creative process and of a broader, personal and very concrete relationship with the world.",
author = "{De Rosa}, Miriam",
note = "This paper is not available on the repository. The article is in press. Creative Commons Attribution License",
year = "2017",
month = "3",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
pages = "28--37",
journal = "Found Footage Magazine",
issn = "2462-2885",
number = "Spring",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A Poetics of Care

T2 - Slowness, Ethics and Enchantment in Gianikian & Ricci Lucchi’s Oeuvre

AU - De Rosa, Miriam

N1 - This paper is not available on the repository. The article is in press. Creative Commons Attribution License

PY - 2017/3

Y1 - 2017/3

N2 - Maintaining that Angela Ricci Lucchi and Yervant Gianikian have a privileged relationship to history may sound quite predictable. Similarly, describing their artistic effort as that of archaeologists, historians, or entomologists is a delicate move: for on the one hand, their famous “Non, Non, Non” claim expresses their basic refusal of any sort of constraining etiquettes, while on the other hand their work still continues to be labeled in a number of ways, thereby demonstrating the impossibility to identify an ultimate footing that synthesizes the fascinating complexity of their oeuvre.Trying to locate my argument outside such rhetoric, what I wish to propose is not an alternative or further reading of Angela Ricci Lucchi and Yervant Gianikian’s artistic trajectory, but rather an attempt to imagine the philosophy innervating their work and to observe the gestures informed by it. From this point, my review of their films and video installations does not aim to provide a counter-description opposed to the several detailed accounts to which I am indebted, but to complement them by seeing these works as the crystallization of a specific way of conceiving time—a way that is apt to restitute the past, inhabit the present and look at the future. Their work employs a conception of temporality that transcends the diegesis, and which I believe cannot be solely described in terms of a feature typical of slow cinema. Conversely, I shall contend that this approach to temporality represents the most immediately recognizable—but at the same time, the densest aspect—of a very peculiar poetics that is merely the audio-visual output of a wider creative process and of a broader, personal and very concrete relationship with the world.

AB - Maintaining that Angela Ricci Lucchi and Yervant Gianikian have a privileged relationship to history may sound quite predictable. Similarly, describing their artistic effort as that of archaeologists, historians, or entomologists is a delicate move: for on the one hand, their famous “Non, Non, Non” claim expresses their basic refusal of any sort of constraining etiquettes, while on the other hand their work still continues to be labeled in a number of ways, thereby demonstrating the impossibility to identify an ultimate footing that synthesizes the fascinating complexity of their oeuvre.Trying to locate my argument outside such rhetoric, what I wish to propose is not an alternative or further reading of Angela Ricci Lucchi and Yervant Gianikian’s artistic trajectory, but rather an attempt to imagine the philosophy innervating their work and to observe the gestures informed by it. From this point, my review of their films and video installations does not aim to provide a counter-description opposed to the several detailed accounts to which I am indebted, but to complement them by seeing these works as the crystallization of a specific way of conceiving time—a way that is apt to restitute the past, inhabit the present and look at the future. Their work employs a conception of temporality that transcends the diegesis, and which I believe cannot be solely described in terms of a feature typical of slow cinema. Conversely, I shall contend that this approach to temporality represents the most immediately recognizable—but at the same time, the densest aspect—of a very peculiar poetics that is merely the audio-visual output of a wider creative process and of a broader, personal and very concrete relationship with the world.

M3 - Article

VL - 3

SP - 28

EP - 37

JO - Found Footage Magazine

JF - Found Footage Magazine

SN - 2462-2885

IS - Spring

ER -