A Model for International and Industry-Engaged Collaboration and Learning

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Traditional barriers of geography, organization, and culture and being broken down by emerging technology [1]. In the recording industry, professionals often collaborate on projects globally, engaging in what Tapscott and Williams [2] call “peer-production.” The potential in these concepts extends to those developing their expertise—they can connect with peers and industry professionals on a global scale. Despite the potential however, most Higher Education institutions fail to engage for cultural reasons. This paper outlines a model for collaborative learning explored and developed through a project funded by the UK's Higher Education Academy. The project involved Coventry University and industry organization JAMES as well as a number of other international partners. The paper looks at the pedagogical background to the project, some typical activities undertaken before summarizing the key outcomes and opportunities for further work.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAES E-Library
Issue number9362
Publication statusPublished - 23 Oct 2015

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industry
learning
organization
academy
recording
education
geography

Bibliographical note

The full text is currently unavailable on the repository.

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A Model for International and Industry-Engaged Collaboration and Learning. / Thorley, Mark.

In: AES E-Library, No. 9362, 23.10.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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