A history of the evolution of guidelines for reporting medical research: the long road to the EQUATOR Network

D.G. Altman, I. Simera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

96 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Testing medical treatments and other interventions aimed at improving people’s health is incredibly important. However, comparative studies need to be
well designed, well conducted, appropriately analysed and responsibly interpreted. Sadly, not all available findings and ‘discoveries’ are based on reliable research.
Our beliefs about best practices for medical research developed massively over the 20th century and ideas and methods continue to evolve. Much, perhaps most, medical research is done by individuals or whom it is not their main sphere of activity; notably, clinicians are expected to conduct some research
early in their careers. As such, it is perhaps not surprising that there have been consistent comments on the poor quality of research and also recurrent
attempts to raise understanding of how to do research well.
More recently, and increasingly over the last 20 years, concerns about poor methodology1 have been augmented by growing concerns about
the inadequacy of reporting in published journal articles
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)67-77
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of the Royal Society of Medicine
Volume109
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2016
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Cited By :40

Export Date: 26 July 2021

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