A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised-designed GABA tea study in children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Conditions: a feasibility study clinical trial registration: ISRCTN 72571312

Penny Hannant, Anna Joyce, Sarah Cassidy, Derek Renshaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: The research has shown an association with sensorimotor integration and symptomology of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC). Specific areas of the brain that are involved in sensorimotor integration, such as the cerebellum and basal ganglia, are pathologically different in individuals with ASC in comparison to typically developing (TD) peers. These brain regions contain GABAergic inhibitory neurons that release an inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA). Brain GABA levels are decreased in ASC. This study explored the effect of introducing a non-invasive GABA substitute, in the form of GABA Oolong tea, on sensorimotor skills, ASC profiles, anxieties and sleep of children with ASC. Methods: Nine children took part: (5 male, 4 female). Each child participated in three tea conditions: high GABA, high L-Theanine (a compound that increases GABA), placebo with low GABA. A double-blind, repeated measures design was employed. Measures were taken after each tea condition. Sensory and ASC profiles were scored using parental questionnaires. Motor skills were assessed using a gold standard coordination assessment. Sleep was monitored using an actiwatch and anxiety measured through cortisol assays. Subjective views were sought from parents on ‘best’ tea. Results: The results showed significant improvement in manual dexterity and some large individual improvements in balance, sensory responsivity, DSM-5 criteria and cortisol levels with GABA tea. Improvements were also seen in the L-Theanine condition although they were more sporadic. Conclusions: These results suggest that sensorimotor abilities, anxiety levels and DSM-5 symptomology of children with ASC can benefit from the administration of GABA in the form of Oolong tea.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)(In-Press)
JournalNutritional Neuroscience
Volume(In-Press)
Early online date6 May 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 6 May 2019

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Feasibility Studies
Tea
Autistic Disorder
gamma-Aminobutyric Acid
Placebos
Clinical Trials
Anxiety
Hydrocortisone
Sleep
Brain
Aminobutyrates
GABAergic Neurons
Motor Skills
Aptitude
Basal Ganglia
Cerebellum
Neurotransmitter Agents
Parents
Research

Keywords

  • Autism
  • GABA
  • anxiety
  • motor coordination
  • sensory
  • sleep
  • tea

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

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title = "A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised-designed GABA tea study in children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Conditions: a feasibility study clinical trial registration: ISRCTN 72571312",
abstract = "Objective: The research has shown an association with sensorimotor integration and symptomology of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC). Specific areas of the brain that are involved in sensorimotor integration, such as the cerebellum and basal ganglia, are pathologically different in individuals with ASC in comparison to typically developing (TD) peers. These brain regions contain GABAergic inhibitory neurons that release an inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA). Brain GABA levels are decreased in ASC. This study explored the effect of introducing a non-invasive GABA substitute, in the form of GABA Oolong tea, on sensorimotor skills, ASC profiles, anxieties and sleep of children with ASC. Methods: Nine children took part: (5 male, 4 female). Each child participated in three tea conditions: high GABA, high L-Theanine (a compound that increases GABA), placebo with low GABA. A double-blind, repeated measures design was employed. Measures were taken after each tea condition. Sensory and ASC profiles were scored using parental questionnaires. Motor skills were assessed using a gold standard coordination assessment. Sleep was monitored using an actiwatch and anxiety measured through cortisol assays. Subjective views were sought from parents on ‘best’ tea. Results: The results showed significant improvement in manual dexterity and some large individual improvements in balance, sensory responsivity, DSM-5 criteria and cortisol levels with GABA tea. Improvements were also seen in the L-Theanine condition although they were more sporadic. Conclusions: These results suggest that sensorimotor abilities, anxiety levels and DSM-5 symptomology of children with ASC can benefit from the administration of GABA in the form of Oolong tea.",
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AU - Joyce, Anna

AU - Cassidy, Sarah

AU - Renshaw, Derek

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N2 - Objective: The research has shown an association with sensorimotor integration and symptomology of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC). Specific areas of the brain that are involved in sensorimotor integration, such as the cerebellum and basal ganglia, are pathologically different in individuals with ASC in comparison to typically developing (TD) peers. These brain regions contain GABAergic inhibitory neurons that release an inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA). Brain GABA levels are decreased in ASC. This study explored the effect of introducing a non-invasive GABA substitute, in the form of GABA Oolong tea, on sensorimotor skills, ASC profiles, anxieties and sleep of children with ASC. Methods: Nine children took part: (5 male, 4 female). Each child participated in three tea conditions: high GABA, high L-Theanine (a compound that increases GABA), placebo with low GABA. A double-blind, repeated measures design was employed. Measures were taken after each tea condition. Sensory and ASC profiles were scored using parental questionnaires. Motor skills were assessed using a gold standard coordination assessment. Sleep was monitored using an actiwatch and anxiety measured through cortisol assays. Subjective views were sought from parents on ‘best’ tea. Results: The results showed significant improvement in manual dexterity and some large individual improvements in balance, sensory responsivity, DSM-5 criteria and cortisol levels with GABA tea. Improvements were also seen in the L-Theanine condition although they were more sporadic. Conclusions: These results suggest that sensorimotor abilities, anxiety levels and DSM-5 symptomology of children with ASC can benefit from the administration of GABA in the form of Oolong tea.

AB - Objective: The research has shown an association with sensorimotor integration and symptomology of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC). Specific areas of the brain that are involved in sensorimotor integration, such as the cerebellum and basal ganglia, are pathologically different in individuals with ASC in comparison to typically developing (TD) peers. These brain regions contain GABAergic inhibitory neurons that release an inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA). Brain GABA levels are decreased in ASC. This study explored the effect of introducing a non-invasive GABA substitute, in the form of GABA Oolong tea, on sensorimotor skills, ASC profiles, anxieties and sleep of children with ASC. Methods: Nine children took part: (5 male, 4 female). Each child participated in three tea conditions: high GABA, high L-Theanine (a compound that increases GABA), placebo with low GABA. A double-blind, repeated measures design was employed. Measures were taken after each tea condition. Sensory and ASC profiles were scored using parental questionnaires. Motor skills were assessed using a gold standard coordination assessment. Sleep was monitored using an actiwatch and anxiety measured through cortisol assays. Subjective views were sought from parents on ‘best’ tea. Results: The results showed significant improvement in manual dexterity and some large individual improvements in balance, sensory responsivity, DSM-5 criteria and cortisol levels with GABA tea. Improvements were also seen in the L-Theanine condition although they were more sporadic. Conclusions: These results suggest that sensorimotor abilities, anxiety levels and DSM-5 symptomology of children with ASC can benefit from the administration of GABA in the form of Oolong tea.

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