A complex adaptive system perspective on role of the Youth Support Coordinators (YSC) in Teenage/Young Adult (TYA) cancer care.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

Case Description
Teenage Cancer Trust, a UK charity created YSC roles to provide youth focused social support to TYA with cancer, complimenting the multi-disciplinary team (MDT) and reporting to nurses in the National Health Service (NHS). Therefore, as non-regulated workers, they act within in an interrelated system of healthcare and philanthropic organisations with differing agendas.
Discussion
TYA cancer healthcare experiences comprise networks of components that interact nonlinearly, on different scales and can create unintended consequences e.g., non-compliance, service transitions, family disruption, peer-group challenges, impaired fertility, hair-loss. YSC’s support TYA to negotiate this. Reporting structures for YSC are within numerous horizontal and vertical subsystems. Elements of YSC work could be done by others e.g. Social Work, Youth Work, Occupational Therapists or Nurses. The labour boundaries of the work of the MDT and YSC are unclear and fuzzy. YSC’s are firmly seated within in complex adaptive systems (CAS) where there is inherent non-linearity as well as systems embedded with other systems which appear to co-exist (Plsek and Greenhalgh 2001).
The lack of professional identity (and regulation) for YSC who stem from various professional backgrounds is problematic and poses a challenge for definition of their role and competence development.
Key Learning
Arguably their role is a consequence of unintended outcomes of creative, dynamic and philanthropic innovation. We need to move beyond the system of professions to consider a system of work as a whole (Allen et al 2002), and look to what we mean by providing youth focussed support in cancer care. Further research is needed.
The YSC role is likely to evolve, as in any CAS. In keeping with Fraser and Greenhalgh’s (2001) views on coping with complexity, much rests on the NHS not merely aiming for change, improvement and responses in successful health systems, but to seek changeability, improvability and responsiveness.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 5 Dec 2018
Event3rd Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Global Accord: Navigating the road through cancer - Sheraton hotel, Sydney, Australia
Duration: 3 Dec 20186 Dec 2018
https://www.eiseverywhere.com/ehome/312967
https://www.eiseverywhere.com/ehome/312967

Conference

Conference3rd Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Global Accord
Abbreviated titleAYACANCER GLOBAL ACCORD
CountryAustralia
CitySydney
Period3/12/186/12/18
Internet address

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Young Adult
Neoplasms
National Health Programs
Nurses
Delivery of Health Care
Charities
Peer Group
Alopecia
Social Work
Social Support
Mental Competency
Fertility
Organizations
Health
Research

Cite this

Cable, M. (2018). A complex adaptive system perspective on role of the Youth Support Coordinators (YSC) in Teenage/Young Adult (TYA) cancer care.. Poster session presented at 3rd Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Global Accord, Sydney, Australia.

A complex adaptive system perspective on role of the Youth Support Coordinators (YSC) in Teenage/Young Adult (TYA) cancer care. / Cable, Maria.

2018. Poster session presented at 3rd Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Global Accord, Sydney, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Cable, M 2018, 'A complex adaptive system perspective on role of the Youth Support Coordinators (YSC) in Teenage/Young Adult (TYA) cancer care.' 3rd Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Global Accord, Sydney, Australia, 3/12/18 - 6/12/18, .
Cable M. A complex adaptive system perspective on role of the Youth Support Coordinators (YSC) in Teenage/Young Adult (TYA) cancer care.. 2018. Poster session presented at 3rd Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Global Accord, Sydney, Australia.
Cable, Maria. / A complex adaptive system perspective on role of the Youth Support Coordinators (YSC) in Teenage/Young Adult (TYA) cancer care. Poster session presented at 3rd Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Global Accord, Sydney, Australia.
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title = "A complex adaptive system perspective on role of the Youth Support Coordinators (YSC) in Teenage/Young Adult (TYA) cancer care.",
abstract = "Case DescriptionTeenage Cancer Trust, a UK charity created YSC roles to provide youth focused social support to TYA with cancer, complimenting the multi-disciplinary team (MDT) and reporting to nurses in the National Health Service (NHS). Therefore, as non-regulated workers, they act within in an interrelated system of healthcare and philanthropic organisations with differing agendas.DiscussionTYA cancer healthcare experiences comprise networks of components that interact nonlinearly, on different scales and can create unintended consequences e.g., non-compliance, service transitions, family disruption, peer-group challenges, impaired fertility, hair-loss. YSC’s support TYA to negotiate this. Reporting structures for YSC are within numerous horizontal and vertical subsystems. Elements of YSC work could be done by others e.g. Social Work, Youth Work, Occupational Therapists or Nurses. The labour boundaries of the work of the MDT and YSC are unclear and fuzzy. YSC’s are firmly seated within in complex adaptive systems (CAS) where there is inherent non-linearity as well as systems embedded with other systems which appear to co-exist (Plsek and Greenhalgh 2001).The lack of professional identity (and regulation) for YSC who stem from various professional backgrounds is problematic and poses a challenge for definition of their role and competence development.Key LearningArguably their role is a consequence of unintended outcomes of creative, dynamic and philanthropic innovation. We need to move beyond the system of professions to consider a system of work as a whole (Allen et al 2002), and look to what we mean by providing youth focussed support in cancer care. Further research is needed.The YSC role is likely to evolve, as in any CAS. In keeping with Fraser and Greenhalgh’s (2001) views on coping with complexity, much rests on the NHS not merely aiming for change, improvement and responses in successful health systems, but to seek changeability, improvability and responsiveness.",
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note = "3rd Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Global Accord : Navigating the road through cancer, AYACANCER GLOBAL ACCORD ; Conference date: 03-12-2018 Through 06-12-2018",
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N2 - Case DescriptionTeenage Cancer Trust, a UK charity created YSC roles to provide youth focused social support to TYA with cancer, complimenting the multi-disciplinary team (MDT) and reporting to nurses in the National Health Service (NHS). Therefore, as non-regulated workers, they act within in an interrelated system of healthcare and philanthropic organisations with differing agendas.DiscussionTYA cancer healthcare experiences comprise networks of components that interact nonlinearly, on different scales and can create unintended consequences e.g., non-compliance, service transitions, family disruption, peer-group challenges, impaired fertility, hair-loss. YSC’s support TYA to negotiate this. Reporting structures for YSC are within numerous horizontal and vertical subsystems. Elements of YSC work could be done by others e.g. Social Work, Youth Work, Occupational Therapists or Nurses. The labour boundaries of the work of the MDT and YSC are unclear and fuzzy. YSC’s are firmly seated within in complex adaptive systems (CAS) where there is inherent non-linearity as well as systems embedded with other systems which appear to co-exist (Plsek and Greenhalgh 2001).The lack of professional identity (and regulation) for YSC who stem from various professional backgrounds is problematic and poses a challenge for definition of their role and competence development.Key LearningArguably their role is a consequence of unintended outcomes of creative, dynamic and philanthropic innovation. We need to move beyond the system of professions to consider a system of work as a whole (Allen et al 2002), and look to what we mean by providing youth focussed support in cancer care. Further research is needed.The YSC role is likely to evolve, as in any CAS. In keeping with Fraser and Greenhalgh’s (2001) views on coping with complexity, much rests on the NHS not merely aiming for change, improvement and responses in successful health systems, but to seek changeability, improvability and responsiveness.

AB - Case DescriptionTeenage Cancer Trust, a UK charity created YSC roles to provide youth focused social support to TYA with cancer, complimenting the multi-disciplinary team (MDT) and reporting to nurses in the National Health Service (NHS). Therefore, as non-regulated workers, they act within in an interrelated system of healthcare and philanthropic organisations with differing agendas.DiscussionTYA cancer healthcare experiences comprise networks of components that interact nonlinearly, on different scales and can create unintended consequences e.g., non-compliance, service transitions, family disruption, peer-group challenges, impaired fertility, hair-loss. YSC’s support TYA to negotiate this. Reporting structures for YSC are within numerous horizontal and vertical subsystems. Elements of YSC work could be done by others e.g. Social Work, Youth Work, Occupational Therapists or Nurses. The labour boundaries of the work of the MDT and YSC are unclear and fuzzy. YSC’s are firmly seated within in complex adaptive systems (CAS) where there is inherent non-linearity as well as systems embedded with other systems which appear to co-exist (Plsek and Greenhalgh 2001).The lack of professional identity (and regulation) for YSC who stem from various professional backgrounds is problematic and poses a challenge for definition of their role and competence development.Key LearningArguably their role is a consequence of unintended outcomes of creative, dynamic and philanthropic innovation. We need to move beyond the system of professions to consider a system of work as a whole (Allen et al 2002), and look to what we mean by providing youth focussed support in cancer care. Further research is needed.The YSC role is likely to evolve, as in any CAS. In keeping with Fraser and Greenhalgh’s (2001) views on coping with complexity, much rests on the NHS not merely aiming for change, improvement and responses in successful health systems, but to seek changeability, improvability and responsiveness.

M3 - Poster

ER -