A Comparison of the general public's, forensic professionals' and students' attitudes towards female sex offenders

B.K. Gakhal, Sarah J. Brown

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    39 Citations (Scopus)
    262 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Research investigating attitudes toward sex offenders has failed to specify the gender of the ‘sex offenders’. Given that most participants are unlikely to think of women as sex offenders, it is likely that reported attitudes relate to male sex offenders. This study investigated the attitudes towards female sex offenders of 92 members of staff employed by a UK chain store (public sample), 20 probation officers employed by a Regional Sex Offender Unit (forensic professional sample) and 64 undergraduate psychology students (student sample). Participants completed the Attitudes Toward Female Sex Offenders Scale adapted from the Attitudes Toward Sex Offenders Scale. Forensic professionals held significantly more positive attitudes than both the students and public. Comparisons between the responses in this study with those of previous studies revealed that the forensic professionals in this study held significantly more positive attitudes towards female sex offenders than professionals in previous studies did towards ‘sex offenders’.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)105-116
    JournalJournal of Sexual Aggression
    Volume17
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2011

    Bibliographical note

    This is an electronic version of an article published in the Journal of sexual aggression, 17 (1), pp. 105-116. The Journal of sexual aggression is available online at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13552600.2010.540678.

    Keywords

    • Female sex offenders
    • attitudes to sex offenders
    • attitudes to female sex offenders
    • Attitudes to Sex Offenders Scale
    • attitudes of professionals working with sex offend
    • attitudes to crime

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'A Comparison of the general public's, forensic professionals' and students' attitudes towards female sex offenders'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this