A Commutation Optimization Strategy for High Speed Brushless DC Drives with Inaccurate Rotor Position Signals

Lu Wang, Ziqiang Zhu, Hong Bin, Liming Gong

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceedingpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The control performance of Hall sensor based high speed brushless DC (BLDC) motor drives depends heavily on the accuracy of Hall sensor signals. Due to the existence of Hall signal errors, the system may operate under unbalanced conditions which will lead to asymmetric currents and high torque ripple. For high speed drive, the pulse-width modulation (PWM) update delay will also lead to inaccurate commutation. In this paper, two Hall signal errors, i.e., misaligned and uneven Hall signal errors, are investigated and a Hall signal balancing strategy is developed to detect Hall signal errors and regenerate balanced Hall signals. A new PWM generation scheme is then proposed to eliminate the PWM update delay. Both simulation and experiment results have verified the effectiveness of the proposed strategy.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2021 16th International Conference on Ecological Vehicles and Renewable Energies (EVER)
PublisherIEEE
Pages1-9
Number of pages9
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-6654-4902-1
ISBN (Print)978-1-6654-4903-8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Jun 2021
Externally publishedYes
Event16th International Conference on Ecological Vehicles and Renewable Energies - Monte Carlo, Monaco
Duration: 5 May 20217 May 2021

Conference

Conference16th International Conference on Ecological Vehicles and Renewable Energies
Abbreviated titleEVER
Country/TerritoryMonaco
CityMonte Carlo
Period5/05/217/05/21

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 IEEE.

Keywords

  • Brushless DC (BLDC) drive
  • commutation balancing strategy
  • Hall signal error
  • permanent magnet motor
  • Pulse-width modulation

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