A 12-month follow-up study of self-management training for people with chronic disease: Are changes maintained over time?

Julie H. Barlow, C. Wright, Andrew P. Turner, G.V. Bancroft

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    40 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective. A previous study reported some improved outcomes at 4-month follow-up after attendance on a lay-led, chronic disease self-management course (CDSMC). The purpose of this study was to determine whether changes were maintained over time (i.e. at 12 months) and to describe participants' current use of self-management techniques.

    Design. The study was a 12-month follow-up of a sample of 171 participants who attended a CDSMC in the UK.

    Method. Data were collected by self-administered questionnaires mailed to participants 12 months after they commenced a CDSMC and via telephone interviews with a sub-sample.

    Results. The sample had a mean age of 54 years, mean disease duration of 16 years, 73% were women, and chronic diseases included endometriosis, depression, diabetes, myalgic encephalomyelitis, osteoporosis and polio. The significant improvements in outcomes identified at 4 months (i.e. cognitive symptom management, self-efficacy, communication with physician, fatigue, anxious and depressed moods and health distress) were sustained at 12 months. No significant changes between 4- and 12-month assessments were found on any study variables. Interview data confirmed that participants continued to use some of the self-management techniques learned on the course.

    Conclusion. Attendance on the CDSMC may lead to longer-term changes in key outcomes such as self-efficacy, use of some self-management behaviours and some aspects of health status (e.g. fatigue, depressed mood).
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)589-599
    JournalBritish Journal of Health Psychology
    Volume10
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2005

    Fingerprint

    Self Care
    Chronic Disease
    Disease Management
    Self Efficacy
    Fatigue
    Interviews
    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
    Neurobehavioral Manifestations
    Poliomyelitis
    Endometriosis
    Health Status
    Osteoporosis
    Communication
    Depression
    Physicians
    Health

    Bibliographical note

    The full-text of this item is not yet available from this repository.

    Keywords

    • self-management
    • chronic disease

    Cite this

    A 12-month follow-up study of self-management training for people with chronic disease: Are changes maintained over time? / Barlow, Julie H.; Wright, C.; Turner, Andrew P.; Bancroft, G.V.

    In: British Journal of Health Psychology, Vol. 10, No. 4, 11.2005, p. 589-599.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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