How the law itself can be a corrupting, criminal force – and what can be done about it

Press/Media: Public Engagement Activities

Description

in an article for 'The Conversation' Lorenzo Pasculli based on his and others' research on the criminogenic effects of the law, illustrates how the law itself can be a corrupting, criminal force – and what can be done about it.

Period20 Dec 2017

Media contributions

1

Media contributions

  • TitleHow the law itself can be a corrupting, criminal force – and what can be done about it
    Degree of recognitionInternational
    Media name/outletThe Conversation
    Media typeWeb
    CountryUnited Kingdom
    Date20/12/17
    DescriptionHave you ever felt that a certain regulation is unfair? Or been upset by the restrictive nature of the requirements to access essential services? Have you found some legal procedures to be too complicated to understand or put into practice? Any of these might have prompted you to wonder why on Earth you should abide by such rules, even if you dismissed the thought immediately afterwards. These are situations where the law might inadvertently lead citizens to find ways to circumvent it, often through criminal behaviour. The article illustrates the main typical scenarios in which the law involuntarily encourages criminality.
    Producer/AuthorLorenzo Pasculli
    URLhttps://theconversation.com/how-the-law-itself-can-be-a-corrupting-criminal-force-and-what-can-be-done-about-it-85287
    PersonsLorenzo Pasculli